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Full text of "Further Sources Of Vijayanagara History"

151
canie out. On taking the muster of horses and foot-soldiers
they discovered that the former fell short (of the prescribed
quota) bjT half and the latter by a fonrth. Therefore, they
demanded that the amara-nayakas should pay the balance (dne
to the government) on the spot. As these (nayakas) enjoyed
(their estates) fur a long time and obtained renown, they con-
sidered that it was enough if their fault was condoned;
however, as they were not in a position to pay the money
charged upon them, they proposed that they would sell their
elephants and horses to the government to clear the balance
standing against them, provided that they were allowed to hold
their estates as before. They also promised that they would
purchase elephants and horses afresh (to make up their respec-
tive quotas). The Raya, having agreed to this proposal, he
settled the price of the animals and took possession of them.
The government acquired in this manner 500 elephants, 12,000
horses and 1,00,000 foot-soldiers with their officers. (Appaji)
brought these elephants, horses and men before the Raya, and
said, "these forces may be utilised, as Your Majesty deems fit."
The Raya having greatly wondered at (the resourcefulness
of the minister) said to Appaji: " You alone possess the skill to
make what is impossible possible". And (as a mark of his admira-
tion) presented to him the sapianga of honour, rt>., a cap, a cloak,
a necklace, ear-rings set with four pearls, a golden garment,
sandal, musk, and tawbula. Then he appointed Tulnva mahouts
(to drive) the kaijltam elephants, and Kabbili, Morasa,
and Tuluva riders (to control) the horses. The Raya then
mounted on an elephant caEed Masti Madahasti, equipped with
a golden howdah, and seating Saluva Tinimarasa behind him,
entered the city of Vidyanagara, accompanied by the fourfold
army. Having sent Saluva Timmarasa and others home, he
said to his friends: " Is it possible to find a minister like
Appaji*Saluva Timmarasa ? Because we have such a minister,
he acquired, as we desired, kaijltam forces during the course of
a siagle day, when we declared obstinately that we would not
enter the city until we acquired them. Having promised that